Kamakura Hasedera Temple in Japan

The Temple of Hasedera in Kamakura, also known as Hasedera Kannon, is famous for having one of the largest wooden statues in Japan, that of Kannon, the goddess of mercy.

Kamakura Hasedera Temple in Japan

The Temple of Hasedera in Kamakura, also known as Hasedera Kannon, is famous for having one of the largest wooden statues in Japan, that of Kannon, the goddess of mercy.

Today, Hasedera belongs to the Jodo Japanese sect, after its initial base as a Temple of the Tendai sect.

Humor History

According to the legend, the Temple of Hasedera was founded in 736. This happened, so the story says, after the Tokudo Shonin monk found a huge camphor tree in Nara's forests in 721.

He cut the tree in half and carved two statues of the Kannon of eleven heads. The smallest lower half was placed in what is now the hueler temple in Nara's prefecture.

The largest upper half was thrown into the sea and washed in the Peninsula of Miura in 736 and soon a temple was founded to house the sacred image.

The statue measures 9.3 m high and is covered with a gold sheet, which was added in the fourteenth century during the Kamakura period of Japanese history.

The history of the Kamakura Hasedera temple

It is said that 1300 years ago, a monk of Hase, which was a small town near Nara, sculpted, of a single camphor tree, two statues that represent the Kannon of eleven heads, the goddess of mercy. The first statue, which was smaller, was donated to the hueler temple in Nara, while the second statue, which was 9.3 meters high, was thrown into the sea.

15 years later, the second statue was found on a beach near Kamakura, and settled in a specially built temple, Hasedera de Kamakura, which eventually became one of the 33 sacred areas in the Kanto area.

Design and Buildings of the Huedera Temple

The Hasedera temple is halfway from Mount Kamakura. The temple, therefore, has excellent southern views on the ocean and the picturesque Playa de Yuigahama.

There are seven main buildings in the temple complex and the surrounding garden land.

The main hall (deep) is flanked by two smaller rooms one that has a statue of the Amidha Buddha carved in 1189 for the 42th birthday of Minamoto Yoritomo to avoid the evil influences associated with that age and the other that has an image of Daikoku .

The Temple of Hasedera is based on two levels and includes the Benten Kutsu, a long and winding tunnel, with numerous statues of Benzaiten, the only feminine member of the Shichifukujin, the seven fortunate gods.

Dispersed to the land of the temple there are thousands of small statues of Jizo, dedicated to lost children in spontaneous abortion, fetal death or abortion.

The months of June and July see the land full of flourishing hortensias.

The Bell de Hasedera temple was chosen in 1624 and is one of the oldest bells in the Kanto region.

Hasedera is part of two pilgrimage routes: the Pilgrimage Route of Sanjusankasho side dedicated to Benzaiten and The Kanto pilgrimage.

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